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ADTEL White Paper

Transparent Screens Leaping off the Big Screen and into Stores


‘Imagine walking up to the beer cooler in a convenience store to be greeted with a full-motion video of a weekend barbecue, with the highlight of the party waiting on the shelves behind the screen!’
By Richard Slawsky
DigitalSignageToday.com

Once strictly a special effects invention, transparent displays are poised to become a central player for  in-store marketing efforts.

We’ve all seen them in the movies—transparent displays that present content
while at the same time allowing the viewer to see objects behind the screen.
But while those transparent screens may seem like something out of science
fiction, they’re here today, and they’re here to stay. Over the next few years
it’s likely that transparent displays will be a standard feature at stores around the country.
In the first-ever large-scale deployment of transparent displays, beer maker
Anheuser-Busch has rolled out 1,000 ThruVu Cooler Displays to stores around
the United States. The coolers, developed by Atlanta-based digital display
maker MRI, feature a door that’s essentially a large transparent screen. With
a full-HD-resolution display, graphics and videos play on the cooler door while
simultaneously allowing consumers to see the product inside.
Although details of the planned marketing effort have not yet been disclosed,
one can imagine walking up to the beer cooler in a convenience store to be
greeted with a full-motion video of a weekend barbecue, with the highlight of
the party waiting on the shelves behind the screen.

Looking behind the images
Although the technology behind transparent screens seems futuristic, the basics are actually not much different than the digital displays we see every day.“Simply put, a transparent display is nothing more than the front glass portion of an LCD computer display without a light source (or electronics) behind it,” Jim Stoklosa, director of digital integration at inreality, an Atlanta-based strategy, design and solutions management agency, told Digital Signage Today. Content displayed as white will actually be transparent on the screen and allow the viewer to see objects behind the glass.
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